Revolution Mother

Revolution Mother

What to do when your child damages or loses a tooth

tooth

As they grow up your little ones will be seeking out more and more adventurous activities. They’ll also start eating foods that haven’t received your seal of approval. Both bring with them an increased risk of damaging or losing teeth. Knowing what to do when this happens could mean the difference between rescuing your child’s tooth or losing it and it could spare a whole lot of unnecessary pain. Below is some advice from the Cuffley Village Dental Practice.

It’s probably the furthest thing on your mind when you’re outdoors having a good time with your family, but as the summer approaches so too does an increased risk of broken and damaged teeth. Spending more time outdoors, participating in adventure activities and crunching down on hard candies and tough foods could all end up in a chipped, broken or knocked-out tooth.

Dental emergencies don’t keep office hours and finding an emergency dentist can take time, even when you are at home. Taking the right actions and doing so swiftly can help you save the tooth or in the least, minimise unnecessary pain.

1. If it’s a milk tooth, it’s probably fine.

Since milk teeth are destined to fall out eventually, if your child has a milk tooth knocked out, it’s not necessary to have the tooth reinserted. So no need to panic. A lost tooth chart is a handy way of tracking tooth loss and will help you work out which teeth are permanent. But do check for facial fractures and bruising. And remember to dispatch the tooth fairy!

2. Preserve a knocked-out permanent tooth. Then get to the dentist. Fast.

If a permanent tooth gets knocked out at the root there is a good chance a dentist can reinsert it-provided you act quickly: Pick up the tooth by the crown. Do not touch the roots. Gently rinse the tooth and if possible, try to place it back in the socket. Get your child to gently bite down on it. If you can’t put the tooth back in their mouth, keep it in a glass of milk. Get hold of a dentist immediately and bring the tooth along. Ice any bruising.

3. A small chip in a permanent tooth is not an emergency.

If your child has lost a small part of their permanent tooth and it doesn’t hurt, you should be able to make a normal dentists appointment and seek dental treatment once you’re at home. A dentist will usually either smooth the tooth down or add some filling. In the meantime, you could use an emery board to file down any jagged edges that might hurt the tongue, lip or mouth.

4. A fractured permanent tooth requires immediate attention. 

A fractured tooth can be extremely painful. When a tooth is cracked, the inside of the tooth is usually damaged and a dentist may be unable to save it. A dentist will need to assess whether the tooth pulp is damaged which would require a root canal treatment. Alternatively, a crown or bridge may be necessary.

While you find an emergency dentist and make your way to their practice, you can protect the sore tooth with gum or some moulded candle wax. Place any broken off fragments in milk.

5. Stay calm.

Whether you’re a child, teen or adult, damaging a tooth can be traumatic. It’s important not to panic and give your child the reassurance that everything is under control: You will get them to an emergency dentist as soon as possible and regardless of the damage, they still have the prospect of a perfect healthy smile ahead of them.

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