Revolution Mother

Revolution Mother

Pain Relief in Labour: The Ins and Outs

Labour can be an uncomfortable, painful experience for many women. Of course the end result is worth it – you have your own beautiful bundle of joy! However, pain relief can be necessary, as some women find it too much to bear. There are many different options out there, from natural methods of relief to more medical forms of relief. Ideally, you should construct a birthing plan to help you, but it’s important to keep an open mind – birthing plans never go fully to plan! Here are the different methods of pain relief available to you during labour, and more information about each:

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Self Help

Self help is a great way to relax yourself in labour, which can help you cope better with the pain. Self help includes:

  • Learning as much as you can about labour to ease your worries. Go to antenatal classes, watch programs, speak to your nurse/midwife/doctor, and read books.
  • Learn how to stay calm during the process, breathing deeply.
  • Trying different positions that feel right for you.
  • Bringing a partner or relative to support you.
  • Having a bath.

Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy is basically being in water during labour, and this can make the whole process feel less painful for you. Ask if you can have a bath, or use a birthing pool to make things more bearable. The temperature will be comfortable but not above 37 degrees.

Gas and Air

Gas and air is a mixture of oxygen and nitrous oxide. It won’t remove all of the pain, but it can make things more bearable. Women usually like this method as it’s easy to use and they feel more in control of the situation. You’ll take slow deep breaths through a mouthpiece as a contraction begins.

Pethidine

Pethidine is usually injected into the thigh or buttock and can help you to relax, which will in turn help you to feel less pain. The effects last between 2-4 hours, and it takes about 20 minutes to work. There are some side effects to be aware of with this kind of injection, including:

  • Sickness and forgetfulness.
  • Can make it difficult to push if it hasn’t worn off by the end of labour.
  • Making it difficult for the baby to have it’s first feed.

TENS

Some hospitals allow you to use their TENS machines, or you’re free to rent one. They are most effective for pain relief during the early stages of labour, where pads are placed on to your back. Pulses are then sent from the machine, and these are thought to help your brain release more endorphins, lessening the pain. They are also thought to distract you from the pain you’re in and help you to feel more in control.

Epidural

An epidural is a local anesthetic, and numbs the nerves that carry pain impulses from the birth canal to the brain. An epidural can give complete pain relief for most women. It’s helpful in women who are having a very long labour, or those who are getting stressed. There are side effects, including:

  • Loss of feeling in your legs.
  • Dropped blood pressure.
  • Prolonged second stage of labour.
  • Finding it difficult to pass urine.
  • A sore back.
  • Headaches.

There are other methods of pain relief available during labour, but the methods above are the most popular. Discuss other methods with your midwife or doctor and decide what’s best for you!

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